JUNE IS NATIONAL CAMPING MONTH

” I don’t need therapy. I just need to go camping.”

S0404043.jpg

June is National Camping Month, a four-week celebration of reconnecting with mother nature and ourselves. In honor of National Camping Month, I decided to share some of my favorite camp spots.

1. QUAKING ASPEN CAMPGROUND

60510_481611193059_3681060_n_thumb.jpg

Situated in the Giant Sequoia National Monument, this seasonal campground provides an escape from the summer heat. At 7,000 feet, Quaking Aspen serves as a base camp to explore the Sequoia groves.

2. ARIZONA HOT SPRINGS, ARIZONA

S0447048-2.jpg

Located on the Colorado River, this campground can be accessed by kayak or by hiking a three-mile trail down from Arizona State Highway 93.

15230650_10103497546290995_7039744226884867747_n_thumb.jpg

Hidden away in a colorful slot canyon, the spring forms several soaking pools averaging 112 degrees Fahrenheit. With endless opportunities to soak, swim, and camp, Arizona Hot Springs remains one of my favorite winter camping spots.

3. LOCUST POINT,  ARIZONA

DSCF1735-3.jpg

In the North Kaibab Ranger District, the remote Rainbow Rim Trail hugs the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The trail connects five overlooks: Timp, Parissawampitts, Fence, Locust, and North Timp. If you are looking for a remote camping experience with sensational views, Locust Point is your destination.

S0527056.jpg

4. LOST COAST TRAIL, CALIFORNIA

S0839227_thumb.jpg

Stretching twenty miles through the Kings Range National Conservation Area, the Lost Coast Trail is a premier coastal backpacking trail.

S0978267.jpg

Sea Lion Gulch is my favorite camp spot on the trail. Consider the views, imagine the coastal breeze, and expect to be serenaded by sea lions throughout the night.

S0059010.jpg

5. MOJAVE NATIONAL PRESERVE, CALIFORNIA

100_3222-2.jpg

There are so may different shelters to use when camping. A hammock between two trees, the simplicity of a tarp, a two-pound ultra-light tent, a backpacking tent, the bomb proof four- season tent, or even the traditional bulky Coleman car camping tent. At the end of the day, I prefer cowboy camping.

100_3172-2_thumb.jpg

The Mojave National Preserve is one of my favorite places to sleep under the stars. Located between Los Angeles and Vegas, the Mojave’s 1.6 million acres guarantees sand and solitude.

100_3215-2.jpg

6. BACKCOUNTRY YURTS, ARIZONA

S0460092-2.jpg

Yurting is backcountry winter glamping at it’s best. Yurt’s bridge the gap between roughing it and camping in comfort. These portable round tent type structures offer the security and warmth of being protected from the elements while still preserving one’s connection to the environment.

S0919124_thumb.jpg

The ultimate winter yurt experience can be found at the Arizona Nordic Village for $50 a night.

https://www.arizonanordicvillage.com/back-country-small-yurts-winter/

7.  SHADOW CREEK, JOHN MUIR TRAIL

1016353_10151797269098060_1651899790_n_thumb.jpg

In 2013, I hiked the John Muir Trail. A torrential four-day rainstorm was the highlight of my first week.

1274779_10151827702885956_557073297_o_thumb.jpg

Wet, cold, and desperately looking for a place to set up camp, I threw my pack off and claimed Shadow Creek as home for the night. Little did I know, there was a masterpiece waiting to my discovered behind camp.

946544_10151797269188060_1474356125_n.jpg

8. BUCKSKIN GULCH, ARIZONA

253737_10150280863188060_7935251_n.jpg

Considered to one of the longest slot canyons in the world, Buckskin Gulch lies within the Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. In 2011, I spent five days exploring Buckskin Gulch before following the Paria River to Lees Ferry.

247864_10150280866158060_7754080_n_thumb.jpg

This camp spot felt like a raised platform bed within an amphitheater of ever-changing light.

9. SANTA CRUZ ISLAND, CALIFORNIA

S0520075_thumb.jpg

California’s archipelago, the Channel Islands, is considered to be one of America’s most remote national parks. Campers arrive by boat, then explore the islands by foot or kayak.

S0174017.jpg

Santa Cruz Island is a sixty-minute boat ride from Ventura, California. Nature lovers should allow a few days to explore the sea caves, snorkel the kelp beds, and hike the island trails.

S0692640.jpg

10.  YOSEMITE PERMIT OFFICE

1526105_10152203371938060_760139736_n.jpg

In 2013, I made numerous attempts to obtain a John Muir Trail permit via the advanced lottery system. Unsuccessful, I decided to apply for a walk-up permit. To ensure I was first in line,  I cowboy camped on the backcountry permit’s office front porch. The highlight of my night was a fellow hiker applauding my dedication as he walked by.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “JUNE IS NATIONAL CAMPING MONTH

    • Trust me, I would love to come camping in Scotland. There is a John Muir Trail in your homeland I am dying to do. I think hikers are so focused on the John Muir Trail in the USA, that we forget about Muir’s birthland.

      Like

  1. I was happy to see that I have been to one of the places you write about – Mojave! I did not go camping there, but I saw Kelso dunes! Unfortunately, I had very little time to explore this area, as it was my second stop of the day after seeing Joshua tree NP, so I got there a little bit before dark (and then drove half the night to Grand Canyon!). The other places look magnificent too, and I did not know there are some permits so hard to get you must sleep under the stars to be the first! Much better reason to spend the night outside than waiting for the newest phone!

    Like

    • Glad you have spent time in Mojave in Mojave. Kelso Dunes are stunning.Next time you visit Kelso, grab your boogie board and go sand sliding. So much fun!! In order to hike the John Muir Trail, (220-mile hike through the Sierra) hikers need to obtain a permit. Due to the permit system being more of a lottery system, these permits are considered to be the gold token for hikers.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s